GemstonesFinishingBirthstoneGem galleryJewelry

History & Folkare

Optical Properties

Physical Properties

Synthetic Gems



Aquamarine comes in the color of sky blue and dark blue. Aquamarine is often dichroic, appearing colorless or blue while it is viewed from different angles. The colour of aquamarine, however, is usually more even than that of the emerald. Much more often than its famous green cousin, aquamarine is almost entirely free of inclusions. Aquamarine has good hardness (7.5 to 8 on the Mohs scale) and a wonderful shine. That hardness makes it very tough and protects it to a large extent from scratches. Iron is the substance which gives aquamarine its colour, a colour which ranges from  an almost indiscerniblepale blue to a strong sea-blue. The more intense the colour of an aquamarine, the more value is put on it. Some aquamarines have a light, greenish shimmer; that too is a typical feature. However, it is a pure, clear blue that continues to epitomise the aquamarine, because it brings out so well the immaculate transparency and magnificent shine of this gemstone. There is hardly any other gemstone in modern jewelry design which is refined in such a variety of ways as aquamarine. Whether it is fashioned as a clear, transparent gem in the classical step cut, or creatively cut in a more modern design, it is always fascinatingly beautiful. Uncut too, or with many inclusions which can be brought into play by the designer in the way in which the stone is cut, it can be refined to produce the most beautiful creations. Designers call it their favourite gemstone. Gem quality aquamarine is found as hexagonal crystals, which may be up to 1m (32in) long and flawless. The best gem quality aquamarine is found Brazil, Afghanistan, Urals (Russia), India and Pakistan. A dark blue variety is occurs in Madagascar.

Myths on Aquamarine >>


Natural Gemstones




The Rainforest Site
Custom Search

Home Finishing Birthstones Gallery Jewelry Contact us